•   What is happening to my family?

    When a family member is incarcerated, how each family member feels, acts, and reacts to this new challenge can be unpredictable. When all or most of the individuals in a family change suddenly because of incarceration, the family dynamics can go places never imagined by any of the family members. These changes to family structure can bring about tremendous insecurities not only into the children’s lives, but also into the lives of the adults and the potential division of the family. This restructuring and the struggles resulting from incarceration are a normal part of families transitioning into the daily life of learning how to survive and cope with having an imprisoned loved one.

     

    A Healthy Family ...

  •   Parentless Children

    On any given day in America, it is estimated that more than 2.1 million children have a parent incarcerated in a state or federal prison. And more than 10 million children are living with a parent who has come under some form of criminal justice supervision at some point in the child’s life. Statistics reflect that parental incarceration can be one of the greatest threats to a child’s wellbeing. They endure obstacles of shame and low self-worth and are at higher risk for developing mental health issues, school failure and substance abuse.

     

    Family Events ...

    Support Groups ...

  •   Family Devastation

    The challenges that children and families with incarcerated parents face are significant. Not only do they experience the trauma of loss, but also a wide range of economic and social hardships that result from a parent being absent from their lives. It is a fact; the incarceration of a parent is associated with great change and uncertainty in many aspects of a child’s life. When a parent is imprisoned, his or her children will likely face additional risk factors, making them one of the most vulnerable and largest at-risk populations in the United States.

     

    Fun Family Activities ...

  •   Isolation

    Imprisonment of a partner can be emotionally devastating and practically debilitating. Loss of income, social isolation, difficulties maintaining contact with their imprisoned family member, deteriorating relationships, and extra burdens of childcare can compound a sense of loss and hopelessness for prisoners’ partners. On the most basic level, for many women it is a heart-wrenching experience that can lead to isolation, depression and social dysfunction.

     

    Women often keep their partner’s incarceration a secret to try to avoid the stigma. Women who keep their partner’s imprisonment under wraps may tend to withdraw from social networks, potentially leading to social isolation. Many families express, “having someone go to prison is similar to experiencing the death of a loved one.”

     

    Support Groups ...

  •   Shame and Anger

    Parents of incarcerated offspring struggle with hiding the circumstances of the conviction of their child no matter how old the child is, due to the criticism they receive along with the unpleasant judgmental looks given by “friends and acquaintances.”

     

    Most parents take the blame themselves for what their child did. They struggle with anger and frustration at missing years of their child's life due to the separation of incarceration. Because of the impact on mothers, many times the fathers are angry at the child for not only committing the crime but also for the emotional damage that it can cause their wives and other family members.

     

    Support Groups ...

  •   Lost Mothers

    The prison system finds that 75% of women in prison are mothers. These “mothers” have left behind their young children, average age of eight years old and 22% under 5 years old, to be raised by family members, foster care, or other state care systems.

     

    Unfortunately out of these children that have been left behind, 10% are in the foster care or other state care system for some period of time. Tragically it is 4 times more likely they remain there, leaving them to “age out” of the system. This impacts their self-worth, which in turn alters their ability to have balanced relationships and to become healthy functioning individuals in society.

     

    Support Groups ...

    Women’s Retreat ...

  •   More Prisoners

    The most recent statistics from the Bureau of Justice Systems indicates that in 2012, about 1 in every 35 adults in the United States was on probation, parole or incarcerated in prison or jail. Statistics show that 70% of incarcerated parents’ children will also be incarcerated, adding to the magnitude of these numbers. In addition, the current percentage at this time shows that 70% of incarcerated individuals will re-offend within three years of their release, compounding the likelihood that children with incarcerated parents will follow in their footsteps.

     

    About Us ...

9208 N.E. Hwy 99, Ste. 107 #50 Vancouver, WA 98665 (360) 904-7302